Fall Container Inspiration in Green and White

fall urns container white green
White Spruce, Ornamental Kale, Ornamental Cabbage, Bacopa, Variegated Ivy, Heather

It’s time to replace the summer flowers with fall plants! I’ve been looking forward to this for a few weeks but since my summer flowers were doing ok I couldn’t bare myself to kick them out. Then we hade heavy rain storms and the petunias finally gave in.

Here’s how I went about it.

Cleanup the summer plants

I just picked the old plants right up and fed them to the compost.

Petunias looking tired

Tip! An evergreen centrepiece brings year-round interest

The evergreen White Spruce bring year-round interest. It’s also more affordable since I only have to replace parts of the container. I’ve had this White Spruce in the containers for two years now. It grows slowly so I’m counting on keeping it for many more years.

At this point, I also kept the Bacopa. It looked fresh enough and its white flowers looked nice with the other plants.

Tip! Arrange the plants while keeping them in their plastic cans

“It was only when I placed the cabbage slightly below the Kale that the combo just fell into place.

I usually place out the plants while keeping them in their pots. It takes quite a bit of moving around and experimenting before I get it the way I like.

Make sure to take a few steps back and look at the container from different angles before you plant. Trust me, it’s much easier than having to dig the plants up again.

When happy with the way it looks, plant!

Make sure all the root balls have soil around them. When finished, water them in properly. Adding some fertiliser to the water is always a good idea.

fall urns container white green
fall urns container white green
Ornamental Cabbage

How many plants fit into the container?

More than you’d think! For fall containers, I usually squeeze in as many plants as I can. They won’t grow very much since we’re having low temperatures and I want the arrangement to look full.

In this 16 inches wide container (40 cm) there is a total of 7 plants.
1 White spruce
1 Ornamental cabbage (4 inch pot – 9cm)
1 Ornamental kale (4 inch pot – 9cm)
2 Heather (3 inch pot – 6cm)
1 Variegated ivy (3 inch pot – 6cm)
1 Bacopa (4 inch pot – 9cm)

Enjoy the result!

fall urns container white green
Hydrangea ‘Limelight’ in the back

Spring bulbs combo – tulip ‘Orange Breeze’ and daffodil ‘Sempre Avanti’

Daffodil 'Sempre Avanti', Tulip 'Orange Breeze', Lady's mantle
Daffodil ‘Sempre Avanti’, Tulip ‘Orange Breeze’, Lady’s mantle

Here’s another beautiful combination of spring bulbs. This one is planted at our entrance side and comes up quite early in the spring.

Daffodil 'Sempre Avanti', Tulip 'Orange Breeze', Lady's mantle

I don’t usually like orange flowers in the garden but mixed with the yellow they do bring a well needed pop of color in the spring.

If you’re looking for inspiration for tulips, daffodils and other spring bulbs I can recommend you to watch Garden Answer’s 2019 Spring bulb tour. She has some really pretty combos!

Garden answer 2019 spring bulb tour

DIY Fall Heather Wreath

I got my hands on some Heather (Calluna vulgaris) and decided to make a wreath.

You can make a this wreath with pretty much any plant that does well when dried. Lavender would be my favorite.

Step 1 – Get your materials

You will need:

  • a wreath form (I used a 20 inch metal form but any type and size is fine)
  • floral wire
  • wire cutters (I used scissors. It would but I would’t recommend it ;-p)

Step 2 – Make bundles

Separate the Heather into bundles and wrap them using the floral wire. You will need around 20-30 bundles, depending on the size of you wreath form.

Adjust the size of the bundles based on the size of your wreath form. Bigger forms require wider bundles – smaller forms do better with narrow bundles.

Step 3 – Tie the first bundle

Tie the first bundle to the wreath form. Make sure it’s tight!

Step 4 – Tie the remaining bundles

Continue to tie the bundles to the form on top of each other. Do every second one facing slightly inwards vs slightly outwards.

Step 5 – Check your wreath

Have a look at your wreath and make sure it looks symmetrical. Prune branches that might be sticking out or add an extra bundle to any area that might need it.

Disclaimer: At this point I realised that I wanted the bundles to start at the bottom and go upwards on both sized (not around in a circle). I redid all the bundles on the right side and had them facing upwards instead. It took some extra time and was was a bit of a pain but still worth it. It would have bugged me if I hadn’t fixed it .

Step 6 – Add decorations

It’s time for the decorations! It’s completely up to you how and how much extra stuff you want to add. You could just go with a nice piece of lace and be done with it.

I chose rowan-berries and hydrangea blooms since I had them in my garden.

Rowan-berries
Hydrangea ‘Little Lime’

Tuck the decoration into the wreath. Use wire if needed. I just poked the hydrangea and berry stems in between the Heather and messed around with them until I liked the way they looked.

Hydrangea “Little lime”
Purple and orange contrast each other

All done!

Hang your wreath in a spot where you can see it every day and enjoy!

Tiny and pretty Heather blooms

Late Summer Container Arrangements

Late summer is my favorite time of year for container arrangements. All that beautiful color both in blooms and foliage!

Purple Chrysanthemum, Sweet potato vine, Dusty Miller (Jacobaea maritima) and Hebe ‘Zea’

This year, I’ve planted up quite a few containers to bring the late summer feeling to the entrance of the house.

Purple Chrysanthemum, Sweet potato vine, Dusty Miller (Jacobaea maritima) and Hebe ‘Zea’

A simple design trick to make an arrangement look great is to pick just a few colors and to repeat them. In this case the Hebe’s yellow and green foliage is repeated in the potato vine. And the pink edges come again in the blooms of the Mum.

Both the Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’ is a perennial and will come back next year. However, it’s always risky to winter over plants in containers so I might plant them in the ground in a month or two, just to be sure they make it though the winter.

Coleus ‘Chocolate Mint’ in the foreground
Coleus, Begonia and Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’

Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’ is one of my favorite plants for late summer and fall containers. It brings contrast to the arrangement that makes the other plants pop.

Rudbeckia Fulgida ‘Goldsturm’, Coleus ‘Chocolate Mint’, Carex ‘Evergold’, Chrysanthemum, Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’ and Ivy
How it all came together

Dwarf Patio Raspberry ‘Ruby Beauty’

First berries are about to ripe.

‘Ruby Beauty’ is dwarf raspberry shrub that grows just 90cm (3ft) tall, has no thorns and usually needs no support. In spite of its dwarf height, it produces about 1.5kg (3lb 6oz) of raspberries, all with traditional raspberry size and flavor.

‘Ruby Beauty’ Dwarf Raspberry loaded with berries

I grow it in a 40 cm (16in) container in vegetable soil and fertilize once a week. It get sun from morning until 5 PM and is doing amazing!

The small size makes it easy to tuck into my vegetable garden.

Vegetable garden in a small space

Window boxes on the south facing wall are great for strawberries.
I’m thinking about getting three more for basil and other herbs.

For a long time I had given up on the idea of growing veggies. Our back garden doesn’t get enough sun and our two bunnies would get to the plants before I did.

One day I was scrolling though photos of Ulla Molin’s garden when I stumbled upon a picture of here veggie garden. It was small and its structure reminded me of my front entrance.

A couple of cheap raised beds, containers and window boxes later I had a vegetable garden.

Coriander gone to town. These were just 3 small plants a few weeks ago.
Rhubarb was here when we moved in
Raspberry ‘RUBY BEAUTY’ (stays small and produces lots of berries).
Chive starting to bloom in the back.
Entrance turned vegetable garden.